Faculty Fellows

The Zolberg Institute convenes distinguished faculty across The New School with demonstrated research and expertise on issues of migration or mobility as Faculty Fellows. Faculty Fellows provide strategic input into the Institute’s research priorities, and contribute to the intellectual life of the Institute.

Jonathan Bach is Associate Professor in the Global Studies Program at The New School and faculty affiliate in the Anthropology Department.  His recent work explores social change through the politics of memory, material culture, and urban space, with an emphasis on Germany and China.


Adam Brown is a clinical psychologist whose research focuses on identifying psychological and biological factors that contribute to negative mental health outcomes following exposure to traumatic stress and developing interventions guided by advances in cognitive neuroscience.


Sumita Chakravarty is Associate Professor of Media Studies at The New School. Her research interests include media theory, digital humanities, borderscapes, media and globalization, film and national identity, and the history and philosophy of media technologies. She is the curator of migrationmapping.org.


Michael Cohen is Director of the PhD in Public and Urban Policy program at the Milano School of Policy, Management, and Environment, and professor of international affairs at the Julien J. Studley Graduate Programs in International Affairs.



Simon Critchley is the Hans Jonas Professor of Philosophy at the New School for Social Research. His work engages in many areas: continental philosophy, philosophy and literature, psychoanalysis, ethics, and political theory, among others.



Alexandra Délano Alonso is Associate Professor and Chair of Global Studies at The New School and the current holder of the Eugene M. Lang Professorship for Excellence in Teaching and Mentoring. Her research focuses on diaspora policies, the transnational relationships between states and migrants, migration in the Central America-Mexico-US corridor, sanctuary, and the politics of memory in relation to borders, violence and migration.

Anthony Dunne is University Professor of Design and Social Inquiry, Co-Director of the Designed Realities Studio, and a GIDEST Fellow at Parsons School of Design. He is also a partner in the design studio Dunne & Raby.



Abou Farman is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at The New School for Social Research. Professor Farman is interested in secularization processes, especially in relation to technology and aesthetics. His ethnographic research has focused on technoscientific projects in the US attempting to achieve physical immortality.


Sakiko Fukuda-Parr is the Director of the Julien J. Studley Graduate Programs in International Affairs and Professor of International Affairs at The New School. Her teaching and research have focused on human rights and development, global health, and global goal setting and governance by indicators.


Teresa Ghilarducci is a labor economist and nationally-recognized expert in retirement security. She holds the Bernard L. and Irene Schwartz Chair in economic policy analysis and directs the Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA) at The New School, that focuses on economic policy research and outreach.


Jeffrey Goldfarb is the Michael E. Gellert Professor of Sociology at the New School for Social Research. He is also the Co-Executive Editor of Public Seminar and Special Advisor to the Provost for The New School Publishing Initiative. His work primarily focuses on the sociology of media, culture and politics.


Victoria Hattam is Professor of Politics at The New School for Social Research. Her research focuses on ethnicity and race in American politics. Currently, her work explores the visual/spatial politics of border walls, urban creeks, and industrial work.



Joseph Heathcott is Associate Professor of Urban Studies at Parsons School of Design.  His research and teaching interests include: cities real and imagined; architectural history, theory, and criticism in the twentieth century; metropolitan and community studies; civic and public cultures; cities as living archives of creativity, urbanity, and design.  In the Fall of 2019, he will be teaching at the Paris campus of Parsons School of Design.

Rachel Heiman is Associate Professor of Anthropology at Eugene Lang College of Liberal Arts at The New School.  Her research focuses on the relationship between habits, sentiments, and spaces of everyday life and the volatility of cultural, political, economic, and environmental conditions.


Peter J. Hoffman is Assistant Professor of International Affairs in the Julien J. Studley Graduate Programs in International Affairs at The New School. His work spans the fields of Strategic and Security Studies, International Organization, International Relations Theory, and Comparative Historical Sociology. Peter’s main focus is on the dynamics of war and global responses, concentrating primarily on the international humanitarian system.

Andreas Kalyvas is Associate Professor in the Department of Politics at The New School for Social Research and the Eugene Lang College of Liberal Arts. His research interests are situated in the intersection of politics, history, and jurisprudence with a strong emphasis on the relationship between democratic sovereignty and constituent power; citizenship, cosmopolitanism, and irregular migration; among others.

Robert Kirkbride is Dean of Parsons’ School of Constructed Environments and Professor of Architecture and Product Design. Dr. Kirkbride has been director of studio ‘patafisico for 25 years, and is also Spokesperson and a founding Trustee for PreservationWorks, a non-profit organization for the adaptive reuse of Kirkbride Plan Hospitals. Robert’s work integrates scholarship and practice, exploring forms of knowledge and know-how that don’t quite fit; things that have been lost or overlooked, including everyday habits and their impressions on the built environment.

Laura Y. Liu is Associate Professor of Urban Studies at Eugene Lang College, The New School for Liberal Arts. Her research focuses on community organizing, urban social movements, race, gender, and labor politics in immigrant communities, and on New York City’s Chinatown.


Bernadette Ludwig is a part-time faculty in the Global Studies Department. Bernadette Ludwig’s research focuses on the intersection of immigration, gender, and race, specifically how immigration and refugee resettlement policies affect refugee and immigrant families in U.S. cities, and how migrants assert their agency to respond to imposed racial and gender hierarchies.

Arien Mack is the Alfred and Monette Marrow Professor of Psychology at The New School for Social Research, where she has edited Social Research since 1970. As a research psychologist, her current interests focus on perception, cognition, and attention.



Anne McNevin is Associate Professor of Politics at the New School for Social Research. Her research interests include the contemporary transformation of sovereignty, citizenship and political community with a particular focus on displacement, mobility, borders, and the global governance of migration.


William Milberg is Dean and Professor of Economics at The New School for Social Research. He is also the Co-Director of the Heilbroner Center for Capitalism Studies. His research focuses on the relation between globalization and income distribution, and the history and philosophy of economics. He teaches graduate courses in international trade, political economy, and the history and methodology of economics.

James E Miller is Professor of Politics and Liberal Studies, and Faculty Director of the MA in Creative Publishing and Critical Journalism at The New School for Social Research. His latest book, Can Democracy Work? A Short History of a Radical Idea from Ancient Athens to Our World, has just been published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux.


Virág Molnár is currently Associate Professor of Sociology at the New School for Social Research. Her research explores the intersections of culture, politics, social change and knowledge production with special focus on urban culture and transformations of the built environment.


Christina Moon is Assistant Professor in the School of Art and Design History and Theory and Director of the MA in Fashion Studies at Parsons The New School for Design. Her research explores fashion design worlds and manufacturing landscapes across Asia and the Americas.


William Moorish is Professor of Urban Ecologies at Parsons The New School.





Jessica Pisano is an Associate Professor of Politics at The New School for Social Research. She conducts her research in Russia, Hungary, and Ukraine, where she is interested in the experiences of ordinary people who live far from capital cities.



David Plotke is Professor of Politics at The New School for Social Research. His research focuses on U.S. politics; American political development: national political institutions, political and social movements, American political thought, citizenship, immigration, and ethnicity; Political theory: democratic theory; collective action.


Fiona Raby is University Professor of Design and Social Inquiry at The New School, Co-Director of the Designed Realities Lab, and a GIDEST Fellow. She is experimenting with research and teaching platforms that use design as a catalyst for a form of interdisciplinary imagining that synthesizes social and political thought, world-making, and emerging technology. She is also a partner in the design studio Dunne & Raby.


Ben Rubin is the Director of the Center for Data Arts at The New School, where he is an Associate Professor of Design.  His innovative applications of media and information technology have been seen at museums, public spaces, and performance venues around the world.


John Rudolph is the Executive Producer and founder of Feet In 2 Worlds, and is a radio journalist with more than 40 years experience as a program host, reporter, editor and producer of documentaries and news reports.  He taught journalism at The New School.



Willi Semmler is Arnhold Professor of International Cooperation and Development at The New School for Social Research.  His research and teaching interests include Empirical Macroeconomics, Macroeconomics of the US and EU, Financial Markets. Economics of Climate Chang, Business Cycles, and Macro Dynamics.


Everita Silina is Assistant Professor of International Affairs at The New School for Public Engagement. Her research has focused on theories of justice and social contract, especially, models of democratic legitimacy, and the new governance mechanisms in the European Union.


Ann Laura Stoler is Willy Brandt Distinguished University Professor of Anthropology and Historical Studies at The New School for Social Research. Stoler is the director of the Institute for Critical Social Inquiry. Her research has focused on the politics of knowledge, colonial governance, racial epistemologies, the sexual politics of empire, and ethnography of the archives.

Radhika Subramaniam is Assistant Professor of Visual Culture at Parsons School of Design.  She is a curator and writer with an interdisciplinary practice that deploys such platforms as exhibitions, texts and public art interventions as conscious forms of knowledge-making.  She is interested in the poetics and politics of crises and surprises, particularly urban crowds, cultures of catastrophe and human-animal relationships.

Miriam Ticktin is Associate Professor and Chair of Anthropology at The New School for Social Research and Eugene Lang College.  Her research has focused in the broadest sense on what it means to make political claims in the name of a universal humanity: she has been interested in what these claims tell us about universalisms and difference, about who can be a political subject, on what basis people are included and excluded from communities, and how inequalities get instituted or perpetuated in this process.  She is currently examining practices of containment at the border.

Joel Towers is a University Professor at Parsons School of Design, and was most recently the Executive Dean of Parsons School of Design. He is also a founding partner [1992] of SR+T Architects.  His focus on ecological issues and their relationship to both design conceptualization and construction methodology underlies his theoretical research and his teaching.

Richard D. Wolff is a visiting professor in the Julien J. Studley Graduate Programs in International Affairs at The New School, and Professor Emeritus of Economics at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.  His recent work has concentrated on analyzing the causes and alternative solutions to the current global economic crisis.


​Rafi Youatt is associate professor of Global Politics at The New School, and currently chair of the undergraduate Environmental Studies program. His main areas of research are global politics and international relations, particularly on questions relating to environment and ecology; anthropocentrism and the politics of the human; and the politics of collective personification.